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Focus On Being Creative?

I was taken by this article written by Carrie Barron for Psychology Today as I for one have always been practical and sought enjoyment and satisfaction through being creative, namely with home renovations.  Do you ever focus on being creative? Her article explains how Dr Kelly Lambert has discovered a relationship between the use of your hands, cultural habit and mood.

Focus On Being Creative?

Consider how you felt the last time you made something by hand.  Whether it was a cake, a home improvement project, a garden, or a scrapbook, it was absorbing and satisfying, right? Maybe you even had a moment or more of euphoria.

Creating something with your hands fosters pride and satisfaction, but also provides psychological benefits. Because it can uncover and channel inner stirrings, wounds smart less and growth ensues. When you make something you feel productive, but the engagement and exploration involved in the doing can move your mind and elevate your mood. As you sift, shape, move and address your project your inner being moves too. As one of my clients said, “It isn’t so much what you can do, but what you do do.” The process itself provides value.  If we can treasure doing as much as having done we provide new avenues for success, self-esteemor self-repair.

Click here to view the original source of the article

I think we all have it in us to be creative in some respect and it’s all too easy to lose focus on being creative. As Sir Ken Robinson (creativity expert) quite rightly points out (in my opinion), as we’re all put through education, we’re all steered towards financial security and subjects that put is the in the best stead for getting a well-paid job.  At the same time, we’re often steered away from out creative side, the arts subjects, which is often where people are in their element.  I’ve featured this clip a few times on this blog now, but in case you missed it, I thought I’d feature it again.  It’s 20 minutes long but entertaining and quite frankly, brilliant.

Sir Ken Robinson: Do Schools Kill Creativity?

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