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Motivation For Goal Achievement

It can be demoralising when you set goals and miss them. We’ve all been there and it’s not uncommon. Interestingly it can be down to your motivation for goal achievement and recent neurological research has suggested that there are 2 motivating factors that act independently from one another in your brain; the “why” and the “how”.  Elliot Berkman and David Rock explain all in this rather scientific article for Fast Company.

Motivation For Goal Achievement

Motivation for goal achievementCarver and Michael Scheier would answer that you’re actually doing both at the same time. This is because both actions–typing words and authoring a novel–are embedded within the same goal hierarchy that contains multiple and different aspects of the goal. Motivation is represented at higher levels of the hierarchy and mechanics are represented at lower levels; asking why moves you up in the hierarchy, and asking how moves you down. With the pitcher, finding his release point is the way, but striking out the batter is the will. To succeed at most goals, both pieces are required–without a will, there’d be no need for a way, and without a way, there is no means to achieve the end–and, critically, the two must remain connected to one another to sustain goal pursuit through to success.

Click here to view the whole article on Fast Company

So if you you can get your head around this, you’ll have deduced that there needs to be a “why” and a “how” motivating factor attached to each goal that is set, or at least, the brain needs to understand both perspectives. They need to remain connected. This makes total sense and is why visualisation is so important when it comes down to goal setting; this provides the “why” – if you can imagine yourself, clearly having achieved said goal in say 3 months’ time, particularly if you attach emotion to the visualisation, then the “how” elements of achieving your goal become less significant and less arduous. They’re just little things that need to get done, rather than massive obstacles that stand in your way.

 

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Ways To Focus And Motivate Yourself

If you struggle with motivation, then these ways to focus and motivate yourself, written by Donna M. White (LMHC, CACP) for Psych Central, are well worth a quick read. Motivation and focusing go hand in hand, as without one, the other will suffer. There are various reasons why people struggle with motivation, ranging from a lack of interest in the task in hand, lack of exercise, poor diet, depression, anxiety, fear of failure etc. A number of these reasons are easily remedied, but some are harder to fix. These tips may just change the way you think about your endeavors and help you get motivated.

Ways To Focus And Motivate Yourself

Ways To Focus And Motivate Yourself Whatever your reason for your lack of motivation, there are ways to get it back. These simple solutions may get you motivated in no time.

  • Weigh the cost of not getting the task done.

When you can’t think of a reasons to get up and get moving, think of what will happen if you don’t.  When we evaluate the costs of not getting something done the answer is usually something negative. If you’re not motivated to exercise, the costs could include gaining weight or health issues.  If you’re not motivated to go to work, the cost could include getting further behind.

  • Hang around inspiring, motivated people.

If I’m feeling lazy it sure doesn’t help if I’m hanging around other lazy people.  Surround yourself with other people who are motivated to do things.

Continue reading on Psych Central

I liked the first point of these ways to focus and motivate yourself. When it comes to motivation, the majority of us are driven more by the fear of what will happen if we don’t do something, rather than through our desire to do or achieve something. So when you weigh up the costs of not getting the task done, this may just kick start you into getting the task done. Give it a go, write down a few ideas as to how you’d feel and what would happen if you don’t complete the task in hand. Once you’ve got them down on paper, keep them to hand and refer to them whenever you need to. Also write down your goals, and then visualise them and how you’d feel accomplishing them.

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